NETWORK TIME DIGITAL CLOCK: Network Time Display Using The WeMos D1 Mini And OLED – DIY #12

NETWORK TIME DIGITAL CLOCK: Network Time Display Using The WeMos D1 Mini And OLED – DIY #12


We are going to learn how to build this cute
little digital clock that communicates with NTP servers and displays network or internet
time. The idea originated from this week’s video that was released by the guy with the
Swiss accent and is based on his sketch. The traditional way to build a clock is by
using a time keeping module, also called a real time clock or RTC. These modules cost
money, they require a battery to operate, they need to be set manually which itself
takes time and this results in errors. They also do not automatically adjust for daylight
savings and thus need to be manually corrected. Obtaining and using network time gets rid
of all of these issues. Here’s what the sketch modules look like.
We start by connecting to a WiFi network to get internet access. We then obtain the network
time from the NTP servers. The sketch uses a pool of NTP servers and you can change this
if needed. We then convert this network time into local time depending on the timezone.
I’ll be displaying UK time but you can visit this link and copy the string corresponding
to your time zone. This string is responsible for any adjustments that are needed during
the course of a year. To build this project, you will need a WeMos
D1 mini or compatible board that uses the ESP8266 chipset along with an OLED module.
The sketch should also work with the ESP32 boards but I haven’t tested this. Download
the sketch and open it up in the Arduino IDE. Start by adding your network credentials as
we need to connect to a WiFi network. Then, make sure you add the correct time zone information.
You can visit the link in the sketch and obtain the string corresponding to your time zone.
And that’s all you need to change in the sketch. Let’s go over the sketch before we upload
it. We use the U8g2 library for the OLED module and we initialize it in the 8×8 mode as we
will only be displaying text. We setup the serial port and start connecting to the WiFi
network. The original sketch had a 2 second timeout for the WiFi connection but this was
too short and caused the board to get stuck in a boot loop. I increased this to 20 seconds
which should be more than enough for the board to connect to a WiFi network. If for some
reason it fails to connect, then it will restart the board and attempt to establish a connection
again. Once connected, we set the NTP server, time zone and try to communicate with the
NTP server to obtain the time. We then display this to the serial monitor and OLED module. The loop function obtains the time and prints
it out every second. The time function communicates with the NTP server every hour and this reduces
the network traffic which also reduces the overall current consumption. The show time
function prints the local time to the serial terminal and also displays this to the OLED
module. The day of week obtained is a number and we use the getDOW function to convert
this to a string that we can display on the OLED module. Before you can download the sketch, you need
to install the u8g2 library. Open up the library manager from the tools menu and type in u8g2.
Select and install this library. We also need to make sure we have the board support package
for the ESP8266 boards. To do this, open up the Arduino preferences window and add the
following URL to the additional board manager URL section. Then, open up the boards manager
and type in ESP8266 and install the package that shows up. Once done, plug in the board
and make sure you have the right settings selected from the tools menu. Your COM port
will vary depending on your system. Hit the upload button and wait for it to complete.
Once done, open up the serial monitor and press the reset button. The board should connect
to the network and print out the local time. Make sure the time is correct and update the
timezone if needed. Connect the OLED module using the wiring diagram
shown here. The OLED module has a 3.3V regulator on board and uses 3.3V for the data-lines
which is compatible with the microcontroller board. Once wired, power on the board and
you should see the time on the OLED module. I will be using this model from thingiverse
for the enclosure. The board sits nicely on this cover which also allows for easy access
to the microUSB port. The OLED module sits right at the other end of the shell so make
sure you add wire of suitable length. I decided to solder some wires to the OLED module and
add a thin layer of double-sided tape to it. I then placed it in position and also added
a bit of hot glue to the top section, near the wires. I then soldered the wires directly
to the board using the same wiring diagram as before which is also shown here. I then
pushed the back cover in place and applied some glue to hold it together. Finally, I
plugged in the microUSB cable to watch it in action. The total module cost for this build was less
than $9. You can obtain the modules at a better price by purchasing them from other websites
that tend to have longer delivery times. I will most likely create a version of this
that obtains and displays online weather, so do subscribe to stay notified. Don’t
forget to hit that like button if you liked this build. Thank you for watching and I will
see you in the next one.

Author: Kevin Mason

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