How to network effectively

How to network effectively


Hi i’m Robin McKay Bell, the author of
finding work after 40 and the founder of Room for Work. A charity that delivers a
employability skills course to skilled workers, managers and professionals. One of the top skills we teach is networking. In this video I’m going to tell you what
it is, why it’s important and how to do it effectively and I’ll give you some
tips on how you can network online and meet people at networking events and
network effectively with them. Let’s have a definition. What is
networking? We call it the art of building alliances. That is, helping other
people achieve their goals whilst you are achieving yours. That’s the art of
building alliances. You want to develop relationships that will help you realise
your goals. You can do this by staying in touch with people that you know already,
by identifying new people that you want to meet and by expanding your contacts
by going out and meeting new people. Why is networking important? Because 70% of jobs are found through networking. Recommendations matter more than CV’s and we trust the opinion of certain friends and colleagues and people want to help
people that they like. How connected are you? Six degrees of
separation is the theory that no person is more than six degrees of separation
away from anyone else on the planet. Consider that you probably know a
hundred and fifty people. People that you can contact or speak to and each of them
knows one hundred and fifty people. So when you do the maths and multiply the numbers you can begin to see that you potentially have thousands of people who
are second-degree connections. Why is this useful? Because your second-degree
connections could prove to be the most important in a job seeking context and
your first-degree connections can introduce you to or recommend you to
people that you might want to meet. Use LinkedIn. It’s the single most
important platform for online networking. You’ll need to improve your photo, you’ll
want a strong headline and you need to be clear about what you’re seeking in
the About section. Also consider recruiters and headhunters will look for
you on LinkedIn, if they don’t see you you’re really missing a trick. Go to events. A major goal in networking is to meet people face-to-face. They’ll need to see you, get a sense of you and what
you’re like and decide if they can help you and if you can help them. Be prepared. Have a one or two sentence introduction memorised so you can tell people what
kind of opportunity you’re seeking. Then be sure to follow that with the
line – I’m hoping to meet someone who can tell me about and then that is a call to
action. They may respond, or they may not but if they do it could lead to them
introducing you to someone that could help you along your path. You’ll need a
business card and it needn’t have your job title, just your name, email address and phone number. The reason is that if someone gives you a card and you don’t
have one to give back you’ll feel weak. The card is there to
empower you. Here are some guidelines to help you have a useful conversation with
someone you’ve just met. First always ask permission to join. Simply say, may I join
you? Then ask questions about the past and
the present to establish trust and build rapport. You might say, have you come
far today? Then move on to what does your company do? What’s your role? Ask
questions about the future to establish points of mutual reference. Why did you
come here tonight? Then move on to who might you introduce me to? Or who would
I speak to further about that? Always follow up and do what you said
you would do. If you’ve offered to send someone the link to an article of
interest or you’ve agreed to a follow-up phone call then make sure that you do it.
It establishes your credibility, it’s professional, it’s kind and it’s how you
build alliances – by helping others. I hope you found this video useful for more tips and advice visit caba.org.uk

Author: Kevin Mason

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