Farm Monitor – March 3, 2018

Farm Monitor – March 3, 2018


[Announcer]
This is the Georgia Farm Monitor. Since 1966, your source for state and national
agribusiness news and features for farmers and consumers about Georgia’s number one
industry, agriculture. The Georgia Farm Monitor is produced by the
state’s largest general farm organization, the Georgia Farm Bureau. Now, here are your hosts, Ray D’Alessio
and Kenny Burgamy. [RAY]
WELL, OUR FIRST SHOW OF MARCH 2018. DIFFERENT MONTH, BUT SAME MISSION. THAT’S BRINGING YOU ALL THE LATEST AG HAPPENINGS
FROM THE GREAT STATE OF GEORGIA. WELCOME TO THE FARM MONITOR, I’M RAY D’ALESSIO
[KENNY] AND I’M KENNY BURGAMY. YEAH! WE’VE GOT A MIXED BAG OF STUFF FOR YOU TODAY. STRAIGHT AHEAD, THE FFA TURNS 90 YEARS OLD
AND THERE IS SO MUCH TO CELEBRATE. JOHN HOLCOMB WITH A SPECIAL LOOK BACK AT THIS
INCREDIBLE ORGANIZATION. ALSO ON THE PROGRAM, SURE THEY’RE SMALL AND
LOOK HARMLESS, BUT THESE PESKY LITTLE CREATURES CAUSE ON AVERAGE 40 MILLION DOLLARS A YEAR
IN DAMAGE. AND THAT’S JUST HERE IN GEORGIA. [RAY]
AND THEN LATER – FROM HERBS TO AZALEAS, THIS HORTICULTURE WONDERLAND HAS IT ALL. TRAVEL WITH US TO LAGRANGE, GEORGIA AS THE
MONITOR IS GIVEN A PERSONAL TOUR OF HILLS AND DALES ESTATE. THESE STORIES AND SO MUCH MORE STARTING RIGHT
NOW ON THE FARM MONITOR. [KENNY]
This year, the FFA turns ninety years old, and already the celebration has begun. Barrow County was the first to have a chapter
in the state of Georgia, and recently, they held an event to get the birthday celebration
started a little early. John Holcomb attended the event and has the
story. [Statham, GA – John Holcomb, Reporting]
The year was 1928, the FFA organization was just getting started in the United States
and it was about to begin in Georgia. The first to take on that challenge in the
state was in Barrow County at Statham Consolidated High School. Here’s a picture of the first chapter’s members. Since then, Barrow county now has three chapters
in their county, and hundreds of others have been started across the state. [Ben Lastly – Executive Secretary, Georgia
FFA Organization] Now we have three hundred and thirty-three
chapters in our state, ninety years later we have nearly forty-two thousand members. We’re the third largest state FFA association
in the nation. [John]
All that’s left of the original FFA chapter is this plaque on the gym of the old school,
but their legacy continues to live on. Proof of that was shown at a celebration event
held at Statham Elementary, where the old high school used to be. Family members of the first chapter and members
of today’s chapters were there, talking about the FFA of the past and present. [Lastly]
To be on site for something like this and get to witness it personally is really cool
for me and it’s great for Georgia FFA to recognize those people who created this program, and
to see some of their family members and let them see what’s going on now. [Delaney Parr – VP, Winder-Barrow FFA]
I know the kind of impact the FFA has had on my life and just knowing that this where
that same impact that it’s had on my life has begun for so many other people, especially
knowing how many FFA members are in Georgia and knowing that this where those people walked
and went to school, it’s pretty amazing. [John]
One by one at the event, former and current FFA members got the chance to share stories
of how the FFA has affected and shaped their lives. One of those that shared is the son of one
of the founding members. He spoke about how his father loved the FFA
and how he passed on that love to him growing up. He ended up joining the FFA in the 8th grade
and talked with me about the impact it has had on his life. [Boyd McLoclin – Former Barrow FFA Member]
FFA taught me that, it’s like if a piece of land’s not productive, you don’t say, well
I’ve got a non-productive piece of land, well you go to work, and you make it productive. I got that value of you take things and you
work to make them how they’re supposed to be. [John]
Looking through the pictures on display, you can tell that in its ninety years, the FFA
in Barrow County has changed the lives of hundreds of students and continues to do so
today. Changing the way they think about agriculture,
and even so much as changing the course of their lives as they choose majors and careers. [Parr]
I’m hoping to start off at ABAC and get a two-year associates degree in agriculture
education, and then I want to transfer into UGA Tifton, and get my full-on agriculture
education degree from there and then I want to continue on and minor in international
agriculture. [John]
This celebration is just reassurance of how important the FFA organization is today as
it was ninety years ago back in 1928. [Lastly]
Ag education is still important. These young people are still learning about
agriculture. Agriculture has changed, but they’re still
learning about agriculture. Just like folks did ninety years ago. [John]
Reporting in Statham for the Farm Monitor, I’m John Holcomb. [RAY]
Alright John, thank you very much. Now, meantime coming off a quality hay crop
last year, farmers are starting to gear up for 2018. And with spring right around the corner, the
University of Georgia hosted their annual Forage and Grassland Council meeting in Irwin
County to share their latest research. Damon Jones was there and has this story. [Ocilla, GA – Damon Jones, Reporting]
As the old saying goes, you get out what you put in. And that’s no for different for livestock
producers as they make sure to feed their animals the highest quality products available
to insure excellent returns. That’s why attending events like the annual
forage conference is so important, as it gives them valuable information for the upcoming
year. [Richard Barrett – Jimmy Carter Plant Materials
Center] You’re making an investment. You’re making an investment in time and your
money on the farms. So, make an investment to learn what you can
from the research data so that the decisions you make, the effort, time, and money you
put out on the farm is going to give you the best results you can have. [Damon]
To get those results, it’s important to be aware of the biggest problems to be on the
lookout for. And this year, that would be the Bermuda grass
stem maggot, which feeds on the grass, causing damage and a lack of green color. It’s a situation that should be monitored
very closely. [Dennis Hancock – Extension Forages, UGA]
Well, the primary thing is to be out looking for it in late June, July in particular. What we’re finding is that if you’re in far
South Georgia or into Florida, it can start showing up a little earlier than that, but
generally speaking, we don’t really start seeing it doing a lot of damage until June. It’s become such a major pest and our estimates
are that it’s costing somewhere in the neighborhood of $40 million a year just in Georgia. [Damon]
Choosing the right cover crop is also essential, as it will increase the number of grazing
days for the cattleman. And fortunately, there are a number of quality
options to choose from. [Richard]
We really don’t have one plant that can do it all for us. So, we have to look at the warm season and
the cool season separately. We have some really good, productive perennial
forages. The idea is really taking these annually planted
forages and being able to fill in the gaps left around the perennials that are the mainstay
and foundation of our grazing program. It’s not as simple as there’s one, best plant
for every situation. But we have a lot of choices. We have a lot of good choices. We just need to understand what it is we are
trying to get back. [Damon]
And with spring right around the corner, it’s time for farmers to start thinking about how
to prepare their pastures. [Dennis]
Fertilizer prices are actually pretty decent right now for us, better than they’ve been
in a while. And so, one of the things I think we really
need to start looking at closely is potassium nutrition in particular. [Damon]
And that could help later in the season, as farmers prepare for what is expected to be
a dry year. [Dennis]
One of the big things that we can do there is to look at ways to stimulate root development. And one of the primary ways we do that is
with maintaining a good soil ph. So, that allows that root too fully develop
through this profile. But then again, phosphorus and pot ash are
extremely important for root development too. [Damon]
However, just like any other year, the biggest advice given is to cut your forage at the
right time to maximize both quality and yield. [Dennis]
The timing of cutting is the absolute number one most important thing. Of all the factors that affect forage quality,
plant maturity is the number one factor. So, in the case of Bermuda grass, if we’re
cutting reliably on a four to five week cutting interval, then we’re going to be optimizing
the quality in general. [Damon]
Reporting from Ocilla, I’m Damon Jones for the Farm Monitor. [RAY]
VERY NICE JOB DAMON. THANK YOU SO MUCH. WELL, IF YOU’RE INTO HORTICULTURE, THIS IS
ONE STORY YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO MISS. WHEN WE COME BACK. JOIN US FOR A TOUR OF THE INCREDIBLE AND VERY
WELL-MAINTAINED HILLS AND DALES ESTATE. [Ted Futris]
Adolescence is a time when young people are trying to figure out who they are. Relationships and their role in relationships
is part of that development and so the models for healthy relationships are lacking for
many at-risk youth across Georgia. [Drishaud Hall]
I don’t know if you agree with me but I remember when I was younger we didn’t have Facebook. And we had to do more talking. [Leigh Anne Aaron]
Relationship Smarts is a research-based curriculum that provides healthy relationship information
through hands-on activities and information through a series of classes. [Ted Futris]
We’ve been real fortunate to have amazing agents both 4-H and Family and Consumer Science
agents across the state offering this program to young people. [Leigh Anne Aaron]
So in order to get an an overall buy-in from the community, especially here in Morgan County,
we have a very well established 4-H and youth program. And so the importance of me as the Family
and Consumer Science Extension Agent collaborating with them really just — you know they’ve
paved the way so for me to be able to kind of jump in on those collaborations that they’ve
already established made it very simple for me to contact the Boys and Girls Club and
say here’s an opportunity for us to come and deliver this grant related education program
to them. [Ted Futris]
It’s a great opportunity for Extension because the collaborations we’re creating with schools,
with community agencies, with the Division of Family and Children Services, these partners
are able to see what Extension has to offer and we have a lot to offer. So these young people aren’t just going to
get relationship smarts, our goal is to expose them to other resources, other great programs
that extension has available in their communities. With this grant, we’re able to provide scholarships
to graduates from the Relationship Smarts program to attend a camp this summer, where
they can interact with other young people, be exposed to more opportunities to promote
their development, and hopefully join 4-H and be continued members and contributors
and participants in 4-H programming. [Drishaud Hall]
It’s all about working together. It hits here first, it starts here, and it’s
all about communicating and partnering with other organizations. [RAY]
TALK ABOUT LOOKING GOOD FOR YOUR AGE. AT 102 YEARS OLD, HILLS AND DALES ESTATE IN
LAGRANGE IS A MASTERPIECE IN EVERY SENSE OF THE WORD. BUT FORGET ABOUT THE INCREDIBLE ARCHITECTURE… WHAT MAKES THIS PROPERTY SO UNIQUE AND EXQUISITE
ARE THE GROUNDS THAT SURROUND IT. WORD OF WARNING FOR ALL YOU HORTICULTURE BUFFS
– WHAT YOU’RE ABOUT TO SEE AND HEAR COULD RESULT IN SOME MILD HYPERVENTILATION. JUST KIDDING…. ENJOY! [Carleton B. Wood – Executive Director, Hills
& Dales Estate] Hills and Dales Estate was the historic home
of Fuller E. Callaway, Sr., and he was a prominent textile entrepreneur here in the area and
actually produced cotton duck. And he built this house in 1916 as a 25th
wedding anniversary gift for his wife, Ida Cason Callaway, and they lived here from 1916
until each of them passed away. And they purchased this property because of
the garden. Back in 1912, the Sara Ferrell family had
developed the gardens, and they loved the gardens. And Sara and her family had passed away, so
they acquired this property. And the Sara Ferrell’s gardens were already
here, and then they added this home to it. So, most people build a home and add a garden. Here, they had a garden and added a home. [Jo Phillips – Horticulture Manager, Hills
& Dales Estate] You know, some of the exterior landscape was
put in after it became the Callaway estate, Hills and Dales. And it’s named Hills and Dales because of
the topography. You drove up here, and you saw that this is
… it sits at the crest of a hill. And so, the entire family estate encompassed
many more acres than what we maintain now at Hills and Dales as a public garden. The original garden, the Ferrell’s garden,
was constructed on terraces. This hill was terraced originally for ag crops,
and terracing was done to control erosion, so your crop didn’t end up at the bottom of
a hill after washing rains. And so, the north face of the hill had been
left under crop cultivation by the Ferrell family, and they built their home in pretty
much the same spot, and the garden was constructed on the south slope, but they left the terraces. And so the garden, you walked down old steps. The main hedges are all boxwood, and we have
several different varieties of those, common box and English boxwood and then some others. We have … and I mentioned the old magnolias,
the southern magnolias that are here that are evergreen. Alice Callaway put in a very nice deciduous
magnolia collection. So, we have a number of deciduous magnolia
trees that bloom early in the year. Some of them will start blooming very soon,
mid-February. They’re very precocious, and they’ll start
blooming soon and bloom on through spring. There’s a variety of bulbs. We have a greenhouse collection, in our greenhouse,
of ferns and maidenhair ferns, polyp odium ferns, begonias, anthodiums, calla lilies. We have an herb garden that’s adjacent to
the greenhouse that she put in, in the 1960s. There’s just a lot here for people to see. [Wood]
Fuller Callaway, Jr., and Alice lived here up until the 1990s, and when Alice Callaway
passed away in 1998 she left it to Fuller E. Callaway Foundation and asked that it be
used for the enjoyment and instruction of the visiting public. So, she wanted it to be a house and garden
museum. And now, people can come in and take tours
of the home, take tours of the gardens. We also do educational workshops. We have lectures. We do a wonderful picnic in the garden in
the spring, which is free. If you bring in a picnic, you get to come
in the gardens free. In the fall, we do stories in the garden. And in December, we decorate for Christmas. So, there’s always something new happening
here. [Phillips]
When people come, they they kind of…they call it, we hear, a hidden gem. They say that the gardens are gorgeous, they’re
marvelous. People that are truly horticulture geeks just
… they, they geek out on the number of plants, the number of species that are here, the design
of the garden, the fact that it’s been here and is still extant from the 19th century,
the historic garden, historic part. So, you know…there’s a lot about the property
that appeals to a lot of people. [RAY]
A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE INDEED AND IF YOU YOURSELF ARE INTO ARCHITECTURE OR HORTICULTURE AND
WANT TO, QUOTE IN QUOTE, GEEK OUT – VISIT HILLS AND DALES IN PERSON. ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED IS THERE ON THE
SCREEN. CHECK THEM OUT ON FACEBOOK OR BY LOGGING ON
TO www.hillsanddales.org. DON’T FORGET. IF YOU MISSED ANY PART OF THIS STORY OR OTHERS
ON TODAY’S PROGRAM. YOU CAN STILL SEE THEM IN THEIR ENTIRETY AT
OUR YOU TUBE CHANNEL, THE GEORGIA FARM MONITOR. PLENTY OF STUFF TO CHOOSE FROM. IN FACT, THE ARCHIVE GOES ALL THE WAY BACK
TO 2009. [KENNY]
AND WHILE YOU’RE THERE, KEEP CLICKING AND LIKE THE GEORGIA FARM MONITOR FACEBOOK PAGE. SEND US SOME FEEDBACK AS WELL. IF YOU HAVE A STORY IDEA, OR IF YOU IF YOU
JUST WANT TO LEAVE US A COMMENT OR SUGGESTION. SEND US A MESSAGE EITHER ON FACEBOOK OR AT
THE ADDRESS ON YOUR SCREEN THAT IS [email protected] [KENNY]
WELL, IT’S A PROBLEM THAT’S OFTEN OVERLOOKED. WHEN WE COME BACK, THE IMPORTANT ROLE THESE
DOCTORS PLAY WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR ANIMALS’ DENTAL HEALTH. [Brad Christian]
As a child my dad told me that this forest near our house that we had owned it as I got
older he started explained that we owned it with other people and eventually the idea
of national forests was explained to me. I think that understanding that we actually
own that it really changed my life. I think that there’s a disconnect between
the public and the lands that they owned. [Conrad Anker]
Some people don’t realize what the National Forest offers now. [Camille Egdorf]
People are just forgetting to go and see these wild places. [Travis Rice]
One of the biggest problems facing our National Forests is just awareness. [Meredith Edwards]
I don’t think a lot of people are aware that it is their public lands. [Jimmy Chin]
I think it’s really easy to take National Forest for granted because it’s always been
here for us. [Bryan Iguchi]
I see it as our most valuable resource in this country and as a citizen I think it’s
our greatest right to wander and roam and be connected to this earth. [Brad Christian]
The thing I wish more people knew about national forests is just simply how incredible they
are. They’re life-changing. [Travis Rice]
You know I’d have to say that my time and experience within the National Forest has
had a huge effect on who I have become. [Bryan Iguchi]
The National Forest means many different things to many people my family can attest to the
fact that after I get done climbing I’m a happier better person. [Camille Egdorf]
It’s where I go to find my peace. It’s where I go to reconnect with nature. [Jimmy Chin]
In National Forests I am completely present. It’s one of the most important things for
me when I need to disconnect from the rest of the noise. [Meredith Edwards]
it makes me appreciate everything else I have in my life. It leaves me with a sense of confidence that
I can’t get anywhere else. [Bryan Iguchi]
It’s in the National Forests that you see the relationship between the land and the
animals. Makes me feel alive that’s the feeling that
I’m looking for in life. [Music]
[Brad Christian] When you own something when you truly own
something you have an inherent responsibility to take care of that thing that’s in all of
us. [Conrad Anker]
To me it’s our shared lands it’s our shared heritage and it’s my responsibility to take
care of it. [Camille Egdorf]
If we take care of it, it’ll take care of us. [Travis Rice]
The responsibility that comes with being a steward of these lands it shouldn’t be intimidating
I think this is probably one of the greatest things that exists under the banner of what
it means to be an American. [Jimmy Chin]
It’s hard to really convey the value of national forests, but if you take a group of kids out
there it becomes pretty obvious – the looks on their faces. I mean that’s how you can understand the value
of it. [Meredith Edwards]
Showing future generations to come that this is a place where you can go and this is a
place where you can heal. This is a place where you can grow as a person. [Bryan Iguchi]
When I talk to my children about the forest and the important to me it’s everything that’s
good in this world in life it’s really a symbol of freedom just seeing what the potential
of humanity is. Go play. Go discover. Go beyond. It’s all yours
[Music] [RAY]
Finally this week Pet owners often do everything possible to protect their animal’s health
– Unfortunately, one thing that’s often overlooked and I myself am guilty of this -is the health
of their teeth and gums. [KENNY]
Charles Denney has more on how an animal’s mouth impacts their whole body
[Charles Denney] Our patient is an eight-year-old boxer named
Isabella. But this is no ordinary vet checkup. Isabella is here for dental work. The dog has overgrown gums and a cyst in her
mouth. Isabella’s owners discovered this on a recent
vet visit. [Thomas Dillon – Isabella’s owner]
“Of course, once you know there’s an issue in the mouth, as an owner you become a little
bit consumed with the behaviors as it relates to eating. I have noticed there’s just not enough room
in her mouth for her tongue. [Denney]
At the UT College of Veterinary Medicine, they do procedures like root canals, tooth
restorations and oral surgeries. Overgrown gums like in Isabella’s case can
lead to bacteria growth, which can get into an animal’s bloodstream and affect other parts
of the body. [Charles Denney – UT Institute of Agriculture]
February is National Pet Dental Health Month. Leaders here at UTCVM say you should have
your pet’s teeth checked once a year, and more often if they’re older or a smaller breed
of dog.” [Tiffany Hunt – UT College of Veterinary Medicine]
“The statistic is that about 80 % of dogs and about 70% of cats have some form of dental
disease by age 3.” [Denney]
Tiffany Hunt is a dental and oral surgeon technician at UTCVM, and took x-rays of Isabella,
performed a biopsy on the mass, and later cleaned her teeth. Hunt encourages owners to brush their pets’
teeth and watch for things like loss of appetite and bad breath. Proper nutrition is also important for a healthy
mouth. [Tiffany Hunt]
“It used to be a thing saying you need to feed them dry food because canned food can
lead to dental disease. That’s kind of more of a myth we’ve learned
over time. Now dry food is nice because they do get that
crunchy texture and mechanical.” “So what can happen is just their teeth can
get loose and their gums recede, same thing as like with humans where we can get bad teeth,
and then they can get loose and get bacteria and infection, so then they need to be extracted.” [Denney]
Unfortunately, that was the case with Isabella, who later had three teeth pulled. But her problems were caught early, and her
future encouraging. Your pet can have the same outlook, as long
as we make dental care a priority when it comes to overall health. This is Charles Denney reporting. [RAY]
ALRIGHT CHARLES, THANK YOU SO MUCH. THAT’S GONNA DO IT FOR THIS WEEK’S EDITION
OF THE FARM MONITOR. [KENNY]
AND A REMINDER. FOR ALL THE LATEST AG INFO REGARDING FOOD,
GREAT RECIPES AND WHAT’S HAPPENING DOWN ON THE FARM. BE SURE YOU CHECK OUT OUR TWITTER, FACEBOOK
AND PINTEREST PAGES. YOU’LL STAY INFORMED AND SEE WHAT’S UP IN
THE WORLD OF FARMING AND WITH US ON THE SHOW. [RAY]
TAKE CARE EVERYBODY. WE WILL SEE YOU NEXT WEEK, RIGHT HERE ON THE
GEORGIA FARM MONITOR. [KENNY]
HOPE YOUR WEEK IS GREAT!

Author: Kevin Mason

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