Engage – Dental Hygiene

Engage – Dental Hygiene


– Welcome to engage. I’m your host Todd Hansen. Thank you for
joining me as we tell the story of engaged learning at Utah Valley University. On this program, we
showcase examples of students who are
learning by doing. Today we’re spending
some time with UVU’s Dental Hygiene Program where the graduation success
rate is 100 percent. Coming up on Engaged. (lively music) The Dental Hygiene
Program at UVU educates it’s students through hands-on learning
such as clinics, anatomical structure
construction, x-ray study, speaking
to and educating K through 12 students
and creating a portfolio all through engaged learning. – [Todd] Dental
hygiene students at UVU are taught by
applying their skills in the real world. They not only have
excellent clinical skills and a wealth of knowledge, they have also been
involved and engaged with their education and with their community and patients. The dental hygiene
clinic not only serves as a real life
classroom for students but it also serves
the local community. The dental hygiene
practice is centered around engaged learning. For example, in the
internship course, the student is able
to select a topic or project that will
benefit and help their particular office
and their patients as well as community groups. Some examples of
their work include brochures on
flouride, gum disease, creating and improving
their office protocols and tobacco cessation programs. One student’s
project was critical in helping a nonprofit clinic to be financially functional and continue their good work. Because of these experiences, students are much more prepared after graduation
than most traditional students will be. UVU students are
able to find and work at a dental practice as
soon as they graduate. I’m here with Doctor George Veit and his wife associate
professor Christina Veit. Welcome you guys,
thanks for joining us. – Thank you, nice to be here. – Tell me first what you both do with this program at UVU. – Well I’m the chairperson of the Dental Hygiene Department and I also have
some teaching duties so I do that as well and I serve as the adviser here too. I’ve been here since 1999. – Wow and what do you do? You work specifically
with the clinic? – Yes as a matter of fact, I was one of the people
who started the program and I came here in 1998
and we are up to our 12 or 13th class right now. I teach a lot of the hygiene, Dental Hygiene One
and Hygiene Two which is the basis
of their skills and then I’m in
charge of the clinic. – So how has the program
evolved over the years? – There have been some
changes and obvious changes. We’ve been able to increase
our student number. We started off with
12 students per class and we’ve been able
to raise that to 16. One of the major changes
we’ve made lately is we just completed a
complete clinic renovation about two years ago. – [George] We had a
wonderful clinic before but now it’s truly
state of the art. It’s just a wonderful
place for learning, for treating our
patients and the faculty even love it too. They’re happy there. I guess another
major change has been we still have our AAS
program in hygiene which is the bottom
line meat and potatoes to grease so to speak
for practicing hygiene and several years
ago we began a BS completion in hygiene that’s
offered online as well and it’s a non-clinical
type of degree and that seems to be
working out nicely. – How important
is it for students to have this practical
hands-on experience in the clinic? – It’s really the only
way that they can see what they’ve learned in class and then you can actually see the progression of
their improvement and the part I really
enjoy is when I see – [Christina] the
day that they’ve got it all under
control and you can see from their body
language and from their confidence levels
that they’re ready. They’ve really
picked up everything and they are learning
more and more every year. – [George] It’s
really a great example in my eyes of service
learning in that the students have
their didactic courses and lab courses and then
when they go into clinic, they’re applying
and refining what they’ve learned up to that point while treating their patients. So it really is
serving the public at the same time so
it’s one of those win-win situations
and we do have a strong and strict
accreditation guidelines that hygiene
programs and other health care programs have to stick
to and so we follow those and give the students
the experience they need to be confident,
pass their boards and be the professionals
that they turn in to. – And the service
aspect of this is what I just absolutely
love because they’re providing such a
valuable service to people who might
not otherwise get it? – Exactly, our clinic is open to the general public and community and unfortunately and
I guess especially in these bad economic times, there’s a lot of folks
that are just left out of the traditional
health care system and we’re finding more and more how important the
health of your teeth and gums are not
just for the mouth but for the rest of the body. Our fee is very
low quite frankly. It’s 25 dollars
but if somebody has financial hardships,
we just make it ten. That way, we’re
really able to serve our patients in the community. Again, win-win and
the students get that great experience
learning as they’re helping the patients. I want to mention,
many of our patients are Hispanic and I think
one of the nice things about our whole
setup is Christina is a native speaker
and she interacts a lot with our Hispanic patients
and you can just see their eyes light
up and they feel more comfortable being
there speaking with her and her helping them out too. – [Christina] We also
not treat the patients in the clinic but
our students go to a lot of schools,
we go to areas like House of Hope, the
WIC for young mothers, they teach nutrition
for young children. The students might
actually be more the ones that do participate. We at least visit
six or seven agencies through the year and
what I thought was that they need to learn a
little bit of Spanish. So what I did this year
is I was very lucky to get a grant
from You Can Serve. That is a program
from American Core. I was able to provide
materials in Spanish like (foreign language spoken), where the students
are actually learning to explain the disease
process in Spanish. We have a lot of flip charts where they can
show how to floss. We’re finding that
the patients really appreciate when
their students are attempting to speak
their language. It’s really very
important and also it is very important for them to learn some Spanish,
the dental terminology, when they go out to
practice in the field because you’ll
find that this area has a lot of Hispanics. – We send groups of
them routinely out to the food and care
coalition which deals with poor people that
are basically homeless and they’re able
to help them out. The House of Hope I
think Chris mentioned, Community Health
Connect and so we have these wonderful
community partnerships which again, just benefits
everybody all around. – Yeah, it just sounds
like a wonderful program. We’re excited to hear
more details about it. When we come back,
we will have a few of the dental students
join us as well. We’ll be right back. – Welcome to Utah
Valley University. – [Matthew] Home to an
educational philosophy that engages it’s students in hands-on practical education. (soft guitar music) I invite you to learn more about one of Utah’s largest,
fastest growing and most dynamic universities. – Hi my name is Tony. I’m a student with
UVU Automotive and this is my class room. (lively music) – [Tony] At UVU,
you can graduate with a diploma and a resume. – Welcome back to Engage. We’re here with some of
the dental hygiene students as well as Doctor George
Veit and his wife Christina. – [Todd] Thanks
for being with us. I’m curious from a
student perspective what this program is like just on a day-to-day
basis for you? – [Woman] It’s really
just, when it comes down to it, it’s like any other specialty project except this program is really hands-on and we have a lot of
opportunities for service. We do have our lecture classes where we learn a
lot of the theory and a lot of the
specific diseases, pathology, the
mechanics behind it and then we’re able
to also go into lab and practice those and then like Doctor Veit and Miss Veit said, we’re able to go into clinic and be able to really
put those things to practice which
for me is really the highlight of the program. That I’m able to go and actually help people with the things that I’m learning what to do. – What about for you Bobby? What are the highlights for you? – There are so many so far. I think it is a really
challenging program. I think it would be a lie to say that it’s not. – Definitely. – But at the same time, I think that all
of the instructors are so sincerely interested
in us doing the best. They want us to succeed. So just the people that
we’re involved with are so amazing. The other thing that has been, something that I didn’t expect when I signed up
for the program, was that with all of
the service learning that we’re doing and going out into the public, I’ve
learned a lot about what the field has to
give to the community and a lot of what
we’ll be able to do. And seeing a lot of perspectives from people who
are in situations that are different than ours and it’s a really good
feeling to be able to know that we’ve made a
difference in their lives throughout the
program, even if it’s in just a small way. – We talked a little
bit about this earlier. People who normally may
not get this service get it at the clinic. How satisfying is
that for you Lauren? – It’s very, when I see people, especially people with families because it’s expensive to take an entire family to
the dentist’s office. We get a lot of
families with kids too and when they come
in and I’m able to work with the kids
or work with the parents and not only clean
their teeth for them but just to show them
how they can maintain it on their own is
very, very satisfying and that’s one of the reasons
I love clinic as well. – We talked about this at the very beginning of the show and I threw out a statistic, 100 percent graduation rate? – [George] Yes, yes. – That’s incredible. – It is and the success rate for our students is
really phenomenal. As you mentioned, 100
percent graduation rate every year since we’ve
been functioning. These ladies are
representatives of how talented our students are. We are really very
lucky with our students. They take three board
tests in order to practice. We have 100 percent
pass rate on those and one of the
tests is actually, it’s a national board exam, it’s a one day written test. They used to have
a rating system for each school after the test and when they were
using that system, out of over 275
programs, our students placed number three
in the country, number four, number five twice. They’re just gifted and talented and it just is a pleasure
working with them and seeing how great they do and how they enjoy it. They come out a real true
hygiene professional. – What made you two want
to go into this field? – For me, I always
knew I really liked, I love science and I love math for a really long
time and I knew I wanted to do something
in the health profession. I’m not a big fan of
blood, large quantities (giggles) which is
why I didn’t want to do nursing per
se but I’ve always just been really interested
in all things dental. I never really minded
going to the dentist when I was young. I really liked the
hygienist just plays a really important part in that and I wanted to
be a part of that. That’s why I wanted to do that. – Well, I also kind
of always have had an interest in
all things dental. (both giggle) At one point I considered
going in to orthodontics but I got married and
I had a couple of kids and so going to dental school wasn’t that realistic
for me anymore. But I tried to go in to nursing. I got excepted to a program and as I was working
as an assistant at a hospital I realized, these are the worst
hours on the planet. (giggles) I never see my kids. And so I thought
well, my first love has always been kind
of with oral health and that kind of thing. So I looked in to
it and found out that this is a really,
really great job for someone that has a family because the hours
are good and you get your holidays and weekend off and you’re never going to have a dental hygiene
emergency probably that you’ll get called in to so. – [George] If I may say, to
echo what Bobbi just said. One of the wonderful
things about a career in hygiene
is the flexibility. Like Bobbi was saying,
you can choose to work one day, two days or more days, depending on your circumstances and your needs etcetera. So it really does well
for that nice flexibility with a nice salary and a
wonderful profession as well. – Can you get this
type of practical experience and class
room instruction anywhere else around here? – Well there are
other hygiene schools in the state and many
throughout the country. It might be up to about 300 now but I will say
this, I just think we’re the best around
for a lot of factors, some of which we talked about. By the way, the
average ACT for these young ladies and their
peers is above 25. I don’t know if I can
get into my own program. (laughing) Any of the state
schools do really have good programs and we
all are accredited by the same accrediting body of The American Dental Association. And so much is what
you put in to it too. Again, that’s another
thing I really enjoy about teaching is the commitment that the students have to being the best they can. – I think it’s easy
to be committed in this program because we
do have so much support. – [Bobbi] All of
the instructors, everyone that we’ve had,
they go out of their way, if we need extra
help they’ll com in on weekends, they really do. They’re there to make
sure that we succeed. – [Lauren] And I never,
ever feel awkward asking someone a question. Sometimes I’ve been in classes where I’m intimidated
by the professor and I don’t really
want to go ask anything but I love all of the
staff in our program and I never feel, if
I don’t get something or if I need them to
show me something, I never feel I’m dumb or I’m not authorized
to ask this question because I know that
they’re just going to smile and help me because they want me to do my best and they want me to learn the right way. – [George] There are
times, I must say, I learned from you
guys too over the years from my students and
they’ve helped me when I prepare a
lesson, I’ll remember some of the things
that we’ve dealt with and it will help me
improve what I do. – [Todd] And there are a
lot of options out there. You could have chosen to go to a lot of different schools. Why UVU? – For me, just like
Doctor Veit was saying, it is hard to get
in this program but I think that
that really testifies to how great the program is. It’s also, compared to
other hygiene schools, it a relatively
inexpensive school as well. UVU provides quality
education for a lower cost. I’ve found there’s a
dental hygiene school down the road, as we refer to it and it’s a great
program but it costs a lot of money and they
accept a lot of people but it’s just not the
same one-on-one time we get with the instructors. I’m just convinced
this is the best place that we can get our
instruction from. – [George] Gee keep
talking, I like this. (laughing) – We need to sign
her up, do PR… – I would like to add
something to that. One of the nice things
about the program too is the faculty to student ratio and the fact that it
is a small program. In class there’llbe the
instructor and 16 students. In clinic, there’llbe
16 students and to help them
there will be four hygiene instructors
and one dentist. They really get the
training that will help them the most with a
faculty ratio like that. – [Todd] Great. Good dental health is
important to overall health. We’re going to talk
a little bit more about that and
we’re going to learn the proper way to
brush your teeth. We’ll be back. – I’m Patty Garcia, a
geology student at UVU and this is engaged learning. (lively music) – [Patty] At UVU, I’m
learning by doing. – I’m Joe Lewis, an
anthropology student at UVU and this is my class room. (lively music) – [Joe] At UVU, I’m sharpening
my mind and my skills. – Welcome back to Engaged. Before the break, we
were talking about the importance of
good dental health and how it relates
to overall health. Can you speak to that? How important that is? – Yeah, the last
couple of years a lot of research has shown
just the correlation between your oral health to your overall health. A lot of links are seen between cardiovascular disease
and your gum health and periodontal disease… for women, if you have
periodontal disease, that can contribute
to low birth weight with your children,
certain diseases can cause inflammation
in your gums and so it’s just
really important that you’re keeping your
mouth clean in effect, to keep your whole
body clean too. – In a case where like diabetes, not only is a diabetic
more susceptible to periodontal disease but also, if someone has
periodontal disease it’s harder to keep
their blood glucose under control so it kind
of goes back and forth. – Is that something
Bobbi that maybe you’ve noticed as
you’ve treated patients in this engaged
learning in the clinic? Have you noticed it
sort of correlates? – Yeah, it’s actually
really interesting to learn in class
these kind of facts and statistics and then you get a patient in class
and you’ll see this classic sign of
something and then to go through and
bring your instructor and it turns out
they really do have this condition that
you’ve learned about and it’s like wow, this is true. – It’s real. (laughing) – Go ahead. – [George] I was going to say, sometimes our hygiene students discover something
that’s going on with a patient like
diabetes or what have you and will make referrals
to their physician and it’s a wonderful
service provided. – [Christina] Actually,
they have to take blood pressure every
time the patient comes in the clinic
and we have sent some patients to
their medical doctors to be checked and I think that’s a tremendous service
because so much of the high blood
pressure are indications of other problems
they may be having. – Okay now let’s talk about what sort of services you guys
perform at that clinic. – Right, well we are
basically are just a full functioning
dental hygiene clinic. A patient comes in, we
take their blood pressure. A lot of diseases we are
able to detect things because in theory,
maybe people visit their dentist more than
they visit the doctor. If we see that their
blood pressure is high, we can refer them
to their physician and sometimes people have found other health problems
because we found – [Lauren] that their
blood pressure is high. We do oral cancer screenings, we are able to examine the mouth to see if there’s
any risk there, just the normal
cleaning, polishing. We also do x-rays
and panoramic x-ray’s which people, we
give them a copy of their x-ray’s
so if they do need restorative work,
they’re able to take that to their dentist
and they don’t have to additionally pay for
those x-ray’s to be taken. – [Bobbi] I think too,
one thing that a lot of, at least the patients
that I’ve had, are surprised about
is the thorough head and neck exam that we give. Before we even start, we
check for lymph nodes, we check for signs of
any kind of skin cancer, we do a thorough intraoral exam to check for any
signs of cancer there or just anything that
could be pathologic. And I’ve had
several of them say, “I’ve never had this
massage pat down before (laughter) “when I’ve went to the dentist.” But then when you
explain what it is, they almost always
are so pleased like, what a great service. – [George] Two of
many other things that they do that
they do well too that are very important… They’ll do
nutritional counseling for the patient and
one of the things we like to stress in the program is prevention and education. So they really are
oral health educators and that they do quite
a good job on that, explaining to the patient
and working with them as to what’s going
on in their mouth, how to take care of it,
the implications of it. So that’s one of
the main focuses and they do very well with that. – And people think they know how to brush their teeth right? – [Bobbi] And that’s
the nice thing about doing it in
a clinical setting is you may get this generalized, this is what you
should do but when you come and you meet
one-on-one with someone, then we can see what
you’re doing well what you’re not doing well. Maybe specific
things that you need that maybe the general
population doesn’t. So we can very
much individualize the education that we give them to benefit them specifically. – So let’s talk about
how we do it right. Because a lot of
people probably think they brush their teeth correctly but maybe have
never been taught. And that’s what you
do in the clinic. – Right, right, exactly. Well the first thing
that I would say, the biggest thing
that we usually notice in our patients
is that they’re missing the gum line. Right along where the
gum meets the tooth. And that’s probably
because they’re brushing kind of straight on
a 90 degree angle and they’re kind of just doing this sort of thing. But, plaque builds
up right along this gum line and
there’s a little pocket in there where it can underneath and start to do damage. So to make sure that
you’re reaching that, you want to move your
brush at a 45 degree angle toward the gum line and
do soft, circular motions. You don’t want to go to hard because gums are very fragile and they can be eventually
brushed away basically. So, you would start
out with a 45, do your soft circles and
then when you’re done with that motion,
you’re going to sweep it away from the gums
to move it out and move just all
the way through. So circle, circle, sweep. Circle, circle, sweep. And then, when you
get to the inside’s of the teeth, where
your tongue touches, particularly on these
lower teeth here. If you can see, when
you have your brush like this, your missing
just a lot of area of teeth and of gum. It’s better if you can
move it at a vertical position where it
fits and do your circular motions
here and sweep it. And then on the
bottom, you would do the 45 degree angle
as well but you’ll have it down obviously,
towards the gum line instead of up and then sweep up. And you’ll do that
all the way around. – And spend more than 30 seconds like a lot of people do. – [Bobbi] Right,
generally it’s basically about 30 seconds on the
outside of these teeth, 30 seconds on the
inside, 30 and 30. So it will be about two minutes by the time your done. Another good tip, a
lot of people miss the very backs of
these back teeth, they’re hard to hit. So one thing you can do is when you’re trying to
get, for example, if you’re trying to
get this lower back one or this lower top one,
instead of opening really wide because
that stretches your cheek out and
makes it very tight. You close half
way down and shift your jaw to that side. It will make your
cheek stretch out so you can move your
brush more like this and get behind those back teeth. – And floss everyday obviously. – And flossing is
really important too. Do you want to talk about that? – Well of course. – [Todd] Really
quickly, we haven’t got a lot of time. – [Lauren] Just
real quick, yeah. Obviously a tooth brush
isn’t going to be able to get everywhere
that pockets growing. You have these
really tight spaces between your teeth and
that’s not going to work. Which is why flossing
is so, so important. You’ll see a lot of
cavities on those back teeth, they’re not just on the biting surface but they’ve encroached between
those teeth too. So it’s so, so important
to floss everyday because that
eliminates the bacteria and eliminates your cavities. – George and Christina,
you have done really well. – [George] Well thank you. – They know they’re stuff. (laughing) – They make it easy. (laughs) – Well and it’s that intellect that you talked about,
those high ACT scores. – Oh gosh and yes, they’re
just wonderful students. – Alright, it seems
like a great program. Thank you all so much
for the education and telling us all about
the engaged learning. – Our pleasure. – And we do have a
little gift for you. We hope you have remember
what we’ve taught you today and we have just a
toothbrush, some toothpaste and some floss for you
that we would love for you. – You’ve been looking
at my teeth haven’t you? (laughing) Alright, thank you. I will accept that
gift graciously. Thank you for joining
us here on Engaged. Next time join us
when we highlight more engaged learning
opportunities here at Utah Valley University. (upbeat music)

Author: Kevin Mason

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