Can I replace decayed and broken porcelain veneers?

Can I replace decayed and broken porcelain veneers?


(magical music) – Sometimes much of what
I do as a cosmetic dentist is replacing or redoing cases done by other, maybe less experienced dentists. This is an example of a material that was supposedly a minimal,
we call it minimal prep. They didn’t really remove
much tooth structure in an effort to be conservative. The result, however, wasn’t very durable and the patient was even
told prior to treatment not to expect this to last maybe more than maybe five or six years. My question to her was,
Why did you say yes? An investment such as this
should last a lot more than five or six years, and
we routinely have patients, I’ve got some cases that look
the same today 20 years later, as they did the day
that we delivered them. So, I think for the
investment for a new smile, we should be expecting something more than five or six years. As you can see in the pictures here, there’s quite a bit of decay that has leaked around
the old restorations. And so as she pulled her teeth apart, we can see some of the tips of the teeth are chipped and worn and broken. From the mirror shot here,
we can actually see a lot of, considerable amount of
decay on some of the teeth. And in fact one of them I had warned that there’s a very possible
root canal in her future on one of these teeth
because of how much decay had gone in place. So, looking as she smiles
here, you can see that it was a smile that she wasn’t proud of. And in fact, it was hiding behind her hand every time she smiled. So, from the side, we
can see that the canine is a bit over-contoured,
and would be ideally, maybe a little bit, some slendering would have a nice result there. From the other side you can see that she is a eight to 10 tooth smile, is what her smile displays. Only using a lab that
is very, very talented and can make the teeth, the
veneers look like natural teeth. There’s usually three or
four colors blended together, the tips of the teeth are
a little bit translucent, or see-through, and toward the gumline might be a little bit more yellow, to look like natural teeth. So as we look from the side we can see that we have filled in any spaces, all the decay has been removed. From side to side. Now, as we retract her teeth,
you can see that the tissues look very, very healthy. That compared to her original appearance, looks a really night and day result. As we retract and look from the sides, we can see a much more healthy gum tissue, as well as the surface
texture of the teeth looks very, very natural. From the mirror shot here, as we look, you can see that the tissues. A tooth that I thought was
gonna need a root canal ended up not needing it to have any endodontic treatment at all. However, that doesn’t mean that there won’t be any in the future, but at this point we don’t
anticipate anything right now. We did not do the lower, in the picture, the lower left, or the posterior left, it was a bridge that she
elected not to treat, and so we did not do that. So you can see a slight
color variation there, but due to budget constraints,
we didn’t do a bridge there. And we were anticipating
doing some implants on the right side of this
picture at some future date.

Author: Kevin Mason

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *