All About Dental Abutments By PREAT Corporation

All About Dental Abutments By PREAT Corporation


In this video we’re going to talk all
about abutments. There are a variety of different types. Which one should we use?
how do you use them? What’s appropriate for different situations? All about abutments. Let’s start with aesthetic abutments , what are they all about, what is aestetic even mean? Sure, aestetic abutment is gonna be used for a single tooth what do you want to have a cement retained crown on top. A lot of the times
these are prepable below buffets by the dentist who then impress send that over
to the laboratory for fabrication. Okay. And talk to me through some of the
differences. There’ s stock abutments versus prepable abutments. Is that
the same thing? Something different? We’re really kind of talking about the same
thing here. And one of the unique things is that sometimes they’re in angulations
of 0 to 15, 17 some even further and that again it’s a great application for the
cuff I anglulation too. Another kind of popular abutments are the UCLA
abutments what are they about and when should you use those? Sure. So you see all
eight abutments were developed to help technicians provide either single-unit
restorations or full mouth restorations multi-unit restorations. There’s two
types of UCLA abutments. There’s non engaging or when you place the abutment
into the implant or the analog it can rotate and spin and there’s engaging
where the above it will engage the heck’s. The engaging abutments are you
specifically for single tooth because you want to have that index so the tooth
doesn’t rotate. Right so it’s sort of locked in place. Exactly. The non engaging
are used for bridges, for bars, for multiple restoration cases
and today when you’re talking about a UCLA abutment we’re talking about a PFM
or a cast crown with a PFM or other material veneer on top. Okay that makes
sense to me. So moving on. From aesthetic and UCLA there’s something called a TI
about them. What’s that? TI bases were developed because of
zirconia and all ceramic crowns. So the TI bases are used as an intermediary
between these ceramic crowns which most the time are a monolithic you know one
material going straight to the implants. There were some early cases that we
still see today where the implant connection was milled were designed with
zirconia crown and because zirconia is rougher and harder than titanium we
would see titanium shards from the zirconia wearing down and moving inside
of the implant. Well really that can’t be good news.
No so the Ti base was the solution to that. The Ti base is looted or cemented
into a most of the time it’s a digitally designed crown. It was zirconia, any of
the high performance polymers, Emax, different materials like that. So the TI
base is again just like a UCLA can be engaging for a single unit or can be non
engaging for a full arch case. Alright, cool. So covered aesthetic we’ve covered
UCLA were covered TI, There’s one other which is an MU abutment which I think
stands for multi-use. What’s the story with those? Sure. So the multi-unit
abutment was designed specifically as a non engaging above it to provide drop
between angled abutments. Okay, so we’ve seen some of those so far. They’re the
ones where you might need to for example look for alignment angular alignment.
Correct. And again this is where the cuff height to land angulation guide is
really gonna come into play let you know what cuff hight you need on the
multi-unit as well as what angulation. And when we talk about the multi-unit
abutments probably something that’s not talked about a lot is it makes the
restoration easier for the dentist. Without a multi-unit abutment or tissue
extension we could be fabricating an implant superstructure that needs to go
through you know three, four, five millimeters of gingival before it’s
seated, which is a traumatic experience for the patient. They have to
numb them up each time it’s inserted and removed. It’s also much more difficult
working sub-gingival than it is above the tissue so again with multi units
it’s a tissue extension. We’re moving our work area
above the gingival, we’re creating a parallel path of assertion and we’re
making it much easier for the final restoration. All right. I think this has
come together for me so good aesthetic we’ve got UCLA we’ve got time we’ve got
mu multi not multi used but multi-units. Correct.
All right, cool. Thanks very much. If you’d like to find out more please head over
to preat.com where you can find out loads of Education, information,
case presentations. Also if you’d like to order any of the components, they’re all
there online as well you can get in touch with us by phone or email or a
contact form or our live chat to talk to our technical team or our customer
support. It’s all there for you at preat.com

Author: Kevin Mason

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *